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What is Adult Education?
Adult Education helps adults do the following:

  • Learn the skills needed to go to college or get a job that can support one’s family.
  • Learn English to find a job or to attain citizenship.
  • Learn the skills needed to help their children.

What is a high school equivalency?
A high school equivalency is a recognized alternative to a high school diploma. If you did not earn your high school diploma, our office can help you prepare and/or sign up to earn your high school equivalency.
What is the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA)?
On July 22, 2014, President Obama signed the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) into law. This law supports innovative strategies to keep pace with changing economic conditions and coordinates four core federal programs that support adult education, employment services, workforce development, and vocational rehabilitation activities. Title II of WIOA, also known as the Adult Education & Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) provides funding for adult education.
I am an Adult Education provider seeking to apply for a grant. Where do I apply?
The Office of Adult Education posts information about grant opportunities for Adult Education providers on the Grant Opportunities page.
Who provides Adult Education services in Georgia?
The Office of Adult Education receives federal funding through the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and grants these funds out to eligible providers through a competitive grant process. To view a list of current providers in Georgia, visit the Program Directory page.
I have a question about Adult Education services in Georgia. Who do I ask?
Visit our Contact Us page to find contact information for the Office of Adult Education or fill out a form to ask a question.
What Adult Education services are available?

Adult Education providers offer free classes to eligible students that can help you do the following:

  • Prepare for the GED test or HiSET exam.
  • Improve your reading, writing, or math skills to help you get a job or go to college.
  • Learn English or other skills needed to attain citizenship.
  • Learn the skills needed to help your children.
  • Get training to find a better job.

How do I know if I can receive services?

You must be at least 16-years-old and not enrolled or required to be enrolled in high school and meet one of the following requirements:

  • You have low literacy.
  • You do not have a high school diploma or equivalent.
  • You are an English language learner.

How can I find an Adult Education class near me?
Visit our Find a Class Near Me page to find the nearest adult education program near you.
What is the GED test?

The GED test is a four-subject high school equivalency test that measures skills required by high schools and requested by colleges and employers. The four subjects are:

Click on each subject above for sample questions. Click here to see an overview of what is on the GED test.

GED

Is there a fee to take the GED test?
In Georgia, if you take the test in person at a testing center, each subject-area test is $40 ($160 for the full battery). If you take the Online Proctored GED test, each subject-area test is $46 ($184 for the full battery).
Who is eligible to take the GED test?
The GED test can only be administered to individuals who:
  • Are at least 16 years of age* (*16 and 17 year olds must enroll in a state-approved adult education program and receive approval to test. Contact your local Adult Education Center for more information.)
  • Have not graduated from an accredited high school
  • Are not currently enrolled in a regular high school; and
  • Can provide a valid photo ID (driver’s license, state identification card, military ID or Passport).
Do I have to be a resident of Georgia to take the GED test in Georgia?
No. You do not need to be a resident of Georgia to take the GED test in Georgia; however, you must take and pass your last test in Georgia to earn the state credential.
How do I register to take the GED test on computer?

Visit www.ged.com or call 1-877 EXAM GED to register, schedule, and pay for the GED test. Credit and debit cards are acceptable forms of payment. You must bring a valid photo ID (driver’s license, state identification card, military ID or Passport) with you on test day. After you create an account, when you are ready to register for a test, the application will display the testing centers in your area based on your zip code.

What score is required to pass the GED test?

In order to pass the GED test, a candidate must score 145 on each subject-area test.

What score is required to pass the GED test?

To pass the HiSET® exam, you must:

  • Score at least 8 out of 20 on each of the five subtests
  • Score at least 2 out of 6 on the essay
  • Achieve a total combined score on all five HiSET subtests of at least 45 out of 100
  • Take all subject-area tests in a uniform language (English or Spanish).

The HiSET pass score is based on a national study of high school juniors and seniors and indicates that 60 percent of graduating high school students would pass the HiSET exam.

When can I retest and what is the cost?

Candidates may take each subject-area test three times without any waiting period. After the third attempt, candidates must wait 60-days after their last attempt before they can test again. The first two retakes will be $20 if the retakes occur within 12 calendar months. Any additional retakes will be $40.

When will I receive my transcript and/or diploma?

Graduates should expect to receive credentials in the mail within 2-3 weeks from the final test date.

How do I get duplicate official transcripts or diplomas?
What can I do once I receive my GED diploma in Georgia?
Georgia residents may be eligible for the $500 HOPE GED Grant, which can be used toward postsecondary education in Georgia. Test-takers must enter their social security number into the GED.com account to qualify. Many employers recognize the GED Diploma as a high school equivalency credential. GED Graduates may also attend technical college with free tuition if you enroll in one of the 17 areas funded by the HOPE Career Grant. Visit here for detailed information on HOPE Career Grant programs.
How can I take the GED test during the COVID-19 pandemic?

To address public health concerns during the COVID-19 pandemic, GED Testing Service is now offering the Online Proctored GED Test. Georgia residents may select the Online Proctored GED Test and take the GED test from home while securely monitored by an online proctor. All subject area tests are $46 each.

To participate in the Online Proctored GED Test, you will need a computer, webcam, and reliable internet — no tablets or phones are allowed. You will also need to take the test in a private room with a closed door. Before scheduling and paying for the test, it’s important to run a system check to be sure that your computer meets the requirements.

To find out more about the Online Proctored GED Test and to see if you are eligible, visit this website and watch this video

To view the differences between an Online Proctored Test vs. In-Person GED Test, click here.

What are the differences between the GED test and HiSET exam?

Both the GED test and HiSET exam are recognized high school equivalency credentials in Georgia. For a comparison of the GED® Test and HiSET® Exam, view this resource.

HiSET

What is the HiSET exam?
The HiSET® exam is an affordable, accessible high school equivalency test option for out-of-school youth and adults without a high school diploma to demonstrate their skills and knowledge and earn a state-issued high school equivalency credential. The five subject area tests are:
  • Language Arts – Reading
  • Language Arts – Writing
  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • Social Studies

Overview of the HiSET Exam. More information on each of the subjects.

Is there a fee to take the HiSET Exam?
In Georgia, if you take the test in person at a testing center, the HiSET computer based five subject-area tests are $26.75 each ($133.75 for the full battery). If you take the test online at home, the HiSET@Home five subject-area tests are $36.25 each ($181.25 for the full battery).
Who is eligible to take the HiSET exam?
The HiSET exam can only be administered to individuals who:
  • Are at least 16 years of age* (*16 and 17 year olds must enroll in a state-approved adult education program and receive approval to test. Contact your local Adult Education Center for more information.)
  • Have not graduated from an accredited high school
  • Are not currently enrolled in a regular high school; and
  • Can provide a valid photo ID (driver’s license, state identification card, military ID or Passport).
Do I have to be a resident of Georgia to take the HiSET exam in Georgia?
No. You do not need to be a resident to take the HiSET exam in Georgia; however, you must take and pass your last exam in Georgia to earn the state credential. [/su_spoiler]
How do I sign up to take the HiSET exam?
Visit hiset.ets.org to set up your My HiSET Account and schedule your exam. You can find a test center near you or sign up for HiSET@Home. You can also call the ETS Customer Service at 1-855-MyHiSET (1-855-694-4738) Note: A $10 fee will be applied when registering by phone.
What score is required to pass the HiSET exam?
To pass the HiSET® exam, you must:
  • Score at least 8 out of 20 on each of the five subtests
  • Score at least 2 out of 6 on the essay
  • Achieve a total combined score on all five HiSET subtests of at least 45 out of 100
  • Take all subject-area tests in a uniform language (English or Spanish).

The HiSET pass score is based on a national study of high school juniors and seniors and indicates that 60 percent of graduating high school students would pass the HiSET exam.

When will I receive my transcript and/or diploma?
For the HiSET computer-based exam, you will receive two retests per subtest at $16 each taken within 12 calendar months. For HiSET@Home, you will receive two retests per subtest at $25.50 each taken within 12 calendar months. Candidates must wait 14 days between test attempts.
When can I retest and what is the cost?
Graduates should expect to receive credentials in the mail within 2-3 weeks from the final exam date.
How do I get official transcripts or duplicate diplomas?
What can I do once I receive my HiSET diploma in Georgia?
The HiSET diploma is one type of high school equivalency offered in Georgia. Many employers recognize the HiSET diploma as a high school equivalency credential. HiSET graduates may also attend technical college with free tuition if you enroll in one of the 17 areas funded by the HOPE Career Grant. Visit here for detailed information on HOPE Career Grant programs.
How can I take the HiSET exam during the COVID-19 pandemic?

To meet the needs of test takers who can’t test at a test center because of public health concerns, ETS is offering the HiSET@Home option. With the HiSET@Home option, you can take any of the five subtests that make up the HiSET exam on your own computer at home or in another secure location. Each subtest delivered at home has the same content, format and on-screen experience as the test you would take at a test center. Your at home appointment will be monitored by a human proctor online through ProctorU®. Currently, at home appointments are available 15 hours a day, seven days a week.

Get more information on the HiSET@Home.

The fee for each subject area test is $36.25 with two retests within 12 months at $25.50 each. View the differences between an HiSET® Computer Based Testing (CBT) and HiSET Exam at Home.

What are the differences between the HiSET exam and GED test?
Both the GED test and HiSET exam are recognized high school equivalency credentials in Georgia. For a comparison of the GED test and HiSET exam, view this resource.

New Program Administrator FAQs

Where do I start?
The information provided on this website is a great place to start! The Office of Adult Education is committed to providing quality information and technical assistance to our local adult education programs. Connect with your assigned Grant Program Support Coordinator. They will develop a plan to help you become familiar with the various aspects of being a Program Administrator.
How do I request access to the Georgia Adult Learners Information System (GALIS)?
As a Program Administrator, you will probably want to request the highest level of access (administrative level), which can only be granted by TCSG. Contact the GALIS Help Desk at datacenter@tcsg.eduwith your request.
Who should I contact to be added to the Adult Education communications lists?
Contact Rachelle Taylor (rtaylor@tcsg.edu). She will send you a Personnel Change form. Once completed and submitted, your information will be added.
How do I know what training or events are coming?
Navigate to the OAE Calendar of Events. This document is used to share OAE training, events, and professional development. In many cases, you can click the links and register for the event right then and there.
I am a new instructor. Where do I start?
The information provided on this website is a great place to start! The Office of Adult Education is committed to providing quality information and technical assistance to our local adult education programs. Please also contact your Program Administrator for additional resources.
How do I know what training or events are coming?
Navigate to the OAE Calendar of Events. This document is used to share OAE training, events, and professional development. In many cases, you can click the links and register for the event right then and there.

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Career Service Quarterly Report FAQs

Is there a list of national stackable credentials we can use as a guideline for our IET Programs?
Unfortunately, at this time, there is not an official list of ABE “stackable credentials” for IET programs to review. If you have questions about possible IET program credentials, please call the state office or contact your local GPS representative.
Is there a way I can make sure my Career Service Tool Report has gone through to the state office?
To know that your report has been completed and sent to the state office, at the end of your report it will state” “your survey has been submitted”. In addition, you are more than welcomed to contact Mr. Ernest at hernest@tcsg.edu to verify the receipt of your report.
Am I able to edit my report after I submitted it?
Unfortunately, not at this time. Once you submit your report, your answers are documented. If you need to change your report, please contact Mr. Ernest at hernest@tcsg.edu.
Can I have a copy of the report I just submitted?
To have a copy of your report, feel free to contact Mr. Ernest at hernest@tcsg.edu to receive a PDF copy of the report you submitted. In addition, it is advised to utilize the excel Career Service Tool template provided on the TCSG website. This will allow your program to save your program quarterly data for future reference.
For question 32 on the Career Service Tool, are the workshops catered to only IET participants?
No. It can be for all students enrolled in an ABE program. Feel free to inform the state office on what your program is doing in the field overall. The workshop section of the report does not have to pertain only to IET students.
Where can I find the Career Service Tool for the Adult Education Program?
You can find the link to the tool by clicking on this link here. Once you are there, you will see a link titled “Career Service Quarterly Report. Once you click on this link, you will find the career tool link, the excel template for the report, and a webinar to explain how to use the service tool.
On the Career Services Quarterly Report, in section 3, would we list a student that is enrolled in the a CNA program at a college while they happen to be attending Adult Education classes?
Yes. Any dual enrollment programs you or your program assisted students to enroll in, you want to make sure your program receives credit for it.
In section 3 on the Career Service Tool, do we only list students with ITA accounts if the funding is used to pay for a program that we are offering?
The state office would respectfully need to know what the student is using the ITA account funding for. The state office would think it would be used for IET or dual enrollment. However, if there is something else an AE program is using it for, the state office would like to discuss this topic beforehand so we can consider what else this student may be pursuing and how to address these situations.
If a student earns a GED® and then eventually continues their education to earn a certification - NOT offered through our program, do we list that in section 6 (earned credentials)?
The Career Services Quarterly Report is focused on outcomes for that current quarter. if the student was enrolled in an Adult Education program and in a Continuing Education program at the same time, that would count as a student your program serviced. It would count as a dually enrolled student who also received their credentials while in your program – for that quarter. But if they are only enrolled in a Continuing Ed after getting their GED, then we would not report that in Section 6 because you are not reporting for that current quarter. Section six (6) aims to capture credentials earned by Adult Education students- for that particular quarter; whether they are enrolled in IET or dual enrollment. Any student in your program that received a credential for that particular quarter can be counted.
When collecting the information for the Career Service Tool Report, am I required to report all federal employees only? For example, I have two teachers who receive state dollars. Do I exclude their numbers from the report?
Reporting federal employee funds only applies to Section 2 of the Career Services Tool Report since those should only reflect federal dollars. However, for the remainder of the report, you can report on outcomes for all of your employees. Any IET or credential-related metrics that are associated with those state employees can still be included in Sections 3 through Section 8 of the report.

What is the mission of CLCP?

The mission of the Certified Literate Community Program is to mobilize every resource available to a community into a literacy campaign that functions within state certification guidelines and will result in a literate community. A CLCP develops written plans appropriate to that community that will lead to the achievement of the following common goals:

  1. To secure the commitment of all leading public and private community organizations to the literacy campaign.
  2. To create and sustain public demand for a literate community.
  3. To achieve new enrollment annually and retain existing enrollment to the extent necessary to achieve the designation, Certified Literate Community.
  4. To assess and document progress and to recognize publicly the incremental economic, social and cultural benefits of literacy skills improvements achieved within the community.
  5. To develop a program that is capable of being sustained for the community to achieve and exhibit its ability to maintain the designation, Certified Literate Community.

Are CLCP efforts a duplication of services? Is this work already being done by technical colleges, workforce investment or other programs?

CLCP is a local solution, not a state or federal solution. Created in 1990 by the Technical College System of Georgia (TCSG) and the Georgia Council on Adult Literacy (GCAL), CLCP asks a community to establish a non-profit collaborative to promote, support and enhance local community literacy efforts.

By making literacy a community-wide commitment, the twin problems of scarce funding and the need to recruit adult students in greater numbers are addressed. The purpose of the CLCP is to harness the power of communities through a coalition that mobilizes all local resources to fight illiteracy. It is a business-education-government partnership resulting in improved literacy levels of children, families and workers throughout entire communities.

As a coalition, CLCP is not necessarily a service provider but rather an umbrella organization that brings all sectors of a community together with all literacy providers to map out the best use of resources already available as well as how to acquire the additional resources necessary to meet local literacy needs.

CLCPs are about economic development, workplace skills, parents able to help their children with their homework, adults able to understand and follow prescription medicine directions for themselves and their children, individuals being able to read a map or road sign, immigrants acquiring English language skills and anyone acquiring computer skills. CLCP is about lifelong learning and acquiring a new skill at any point in life. Technical colleges, workforce investment programs, and school systems are part of this effort but could not accomplish these things on their own.

What are some of the unique things that CLCPs do?

To date, CLCPs have provided the funding to build adult learning centers, addressed transportation and childcare needs, provided materials, equipment, tutors, additional class locations and GED testing scholarships. CLCPs manage local “Dictionary Projects,” after school homework programs and reading initiatives in the schools. They work with students in high school to prevent dropouts. They promote adult education services, recruit and retain adult education students in the classes and provide a support system to students and literacy providers alike.

CLCPs ultimately change the culture of a community. When education is made a priority and is recognized as being tied to resolving community concerns such as crime, poverty, teenage pregnancy and substance abuse, and when educational achievement is respected and celebrated, those who need to go back to school do so and those who are in school stay there.

How are CLCPs funded?
CLCPs are self-designed, self-owned, self-managed community efforts. CLCPs decide their budgets based on the goals and director’s salary. They set and are responsible for funding their own efforts. As mentioned previously, the purpose of CLCP is to mobilize local resources. As collaboratives, CLCPs find success with grants, foundations and local fundraisers. For as many CLCPs that exist, there are that many different funding formulas.

 


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